Canada's Long-Term Plan for Used Nuclear Fuel

The deep geological repository is a network of underground tunnels and placement rooms for used nuclear fuel containers. It is designed to safely contain and isolate Canada's used nuclear fuel over the long term.

The Township of Huron-Kinloss is learning more about Canada's plan for the safe, long-term management of used nuclear fuel. The plan requires that all of Canada’s used nuclear fuel be safely and securely isolated from people and the environment in a deep geological repository (DGR). The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing this national infrastructure project estimated to cost $24 billion. This plan is also known as the Adaptive Phased Management Project.

The Township is one of five communities remaining in NWMO's Site Selection Process. This means Huron-Kinloss is being considered as a location to host the proposed DGR to safety store all of Canada’s used nuclear fuel.

The NWMO is expected to identify a single site by 2023. Once a site has been identified, additional technical studies will be required, and all regulatory requirements and approvals must be obtained through the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC).

The DGR is a network of underground tunnels and placement rooms for used nuclear fuel containers. It is designed to safely contain and isolate Canada's used nuclear fuel over the long term. A conceptual layout for a repository would require an underground footprint of about two kilometres by three kilometres (about 600 hectares or 1,500 acres).

The Township of Huron-Kinloss is learning more about Canada's plan for the safe, long-term management of used nuclear fuel. The plan requires that all of Canada’s used nuclear fuel be safely and securely isolated from people and the environment in a deep geological repository (DGR). The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing this national infrastructure project estimated to cost $24 billion. This plan is also known as the Adaptive Phased Management Project.

The Township is one of five communities remaining in NWMO's Site Selection Process. This means Huron-Kinloss is being considered as a location to host the proposed DGR to safety store all of Canada’s used nuclear fuel.

The NWMO is expected to identify a single site by 2023. Once a site has been identified, additional technical studies will be required, and all regulatory requirements and approvals must be obtained through the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC).

The DGR is a network of underground tunnels and placement rooms for used nuclear fuel containers. It is designed to safely contain and isolate Canada's used nuclear fuel over the long term. A conceptual layout for a repository would require an underground footprint of about two kilometres by three kilometres (about 600 hectares or 1,500 acres).

  • Huron-Kinloss Nuclear Waste Management Symposium

    6 days ago
    2019 symposium flyer2

    Residents of Huron-Kinloss are invited to the 2019 Huron-Kinloss Nuclear Waste Management Symposium on Friday, August 23 from 8:30 am - 12:30 pm at the Ripley-Huron Community Centre.

    The Symposium will provide an opportunity for Huron-Kinloss residents to learn more about Canada's plan for the long-term management of used nuclear fuel, how the Township is involved and the next steps in the site-selection process. Engineers, scientists and community engagement advisors from Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) provided presentations on a variety of topics including Bruce County Geology, Transportation Safety, Safety of a Deep Geological Repository and the Land Access Process.

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    Residents of Huron-Kinloss are invited to the 2019 Huron-Kinloss Nuclear Waste Management Symposium on Friday, August 23 from 8:30 am - 12:30 pm at the Ripley-Huron Community Centre.

    The Symposium will provide an opportunity for Huron-Kinloss residents to learn more about Canada's plan for the long-term management of used nuclear fuel, how the Township is involved and the next steps in the site-selection process. Engineers, scientists and community engagement advisors from Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) provided presentations on a variety of topics including Bruce County Geology, Transportation Safety, Safety of a Deep Geological Repository and the Land Access Process.

    Lunch is provided. Pre-registration is required. Contact 519-395-3735 or edewar@huronkinloss.com to register. Space is limited.

    New this year, will be the NWMO Mobile Learn More Centre. This interactive exhibit includes 3D models, interactive technology, hands-on learning opportunities, videos, photos and more. Be sure to stop by and visit this unit between 8 am and 2 pm outside the Ripley-Huron Community Centre.


  • Huron-Kinloss and NWMO Land Access Process

    6 days ago

    The next step for Huron-Kinloss in the site selection process is the Land Access Process. The NWMO is asking landowners to sign option agreements to access sufficient land for a potential repository site.

    Optioning the land will provide the NWMO with two important assurances: the knowledge it could acquire sufficient land for the repository in the future and the ability to complete its site investigation work.

    The NWMO is committed to protecting farmland and minimizing disruption to local businesses. The NWMO will only need to access small areas of the optioned lands to conduct its studies and we expect most,...

    The next step for Huron-Kinloss in the site selection process is the Land Access Process. The NWMO is asking landowners to sign option agreements to access sufficient land for a potential repository site.

    Optioning the land will provide the NWMO with two important assurances: the knowledge it could acquire sufficient land for the repository in the future and the ability to complete its site investigation work.

    The NWMO is committed to protecting farmland and minimizing disruption to local businesses. The NWMO will only need to access small areas of the optioned lands to conduct its studies and we expect most, if not all, of the ongoing operations will be able to continue.

    There are currently five potential siting areas engaged in the site selection process – no site has been selected.


  • Safely Managing Used Nuclear Fuel in Canada

    6 days ago

    During a three-year study, the public identified a number of key objectives that it considered essential to the project. These included public health and safety, protection of workers, and protection of the environment.

    During a three-year study, the public identified a number of key objectives that it considered essential to the project. These included public health and safety, protection of workers, and protection of the environment.