Where have all the ash trees gone?

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Since 2010, the Township of Huron-Kinloss has been monitoring the Emerald Ash Borer migration and the affect the bug has on our ash trees. First signs of the Emerald Ash Borer were discovered in Lucknow in 2010, followed by Ripley and Point Clark in 2011.

The Township of Huron-Kinloss is attempting to act proactively to ensure the Emerald Ash Borer and the affected ash trees do not cause any damage to adjacent properties or create an unsafe environment for residents.

The Community Services Department is using the Have Your Say HK website to keep residents informed and updated with the project progress, ongoing details, and any changes. Have Your Say HK will provide a platform for any concerns with the project to be heard, and ask questions.


Since 2010, the Township of Huron-Kinloss has been monitoring the Emerald Ash Borer migration and the affect the bug has on our ash trees. First signs of the Emerald Ash Borer were discovered in Lucknow in 2010, followed by Ripley and Point Clark in 2011.

The Township of Huron-Kinloss is attempting to act proactively to ensure the Emerald Ash Borer and the affected ash trees do not cause any damage to adjacent properties or create an unsafe environment for residents.

The Community Services Department is using the Have Your Say HK website to keep residents informed and updated with the project progress, ongoing details, and any changes. Have Your Say HK will provide a platform for any concerns with the project to be heard, and ask questions.


  • Request for Quotes - Township of Huron-Kinloss

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    06 Sep 2018

    On July 4th 2018, Mike Fair, Director of Community Services, brought a report to Council with the following information:

    Background:

    Council is aware of the Emerald Ash Borer and the damages caused to Ash Trees in the last few years. The Township has recently approved the removal of 26 ash trees south of Bell Drive and west of Lake Range on Municipal property. The tree logs will be removed in exchange for reduced pricing, and the tops laid down to prevent injury to anyone in the future. Staff is recommending that ash trees along Boiler Beach Road on the lake side, in addition to ash trees on the Municipally owned parcels of land on the Algonquin Bluff directly north of the 10th Concession be removed if possible or at minimum laid down if removal is not possible.

    Comments:

    Staff would like to propose a request for quotation for the removal of all the Ash tree between Concession 10 and the Kincardine Boundary on the Boiler Beach Road, in addition to the Township owned parcels of Land along the Algonquin Bluff. Please see the maps for more information, Staff would advertise and review the Ash Tree inventory, and any other tree deemed a hazard with any potential bidders. If approved, staff would also complete a community engagement plan to ensure that all residents were kept informed of any works, and progress.

  • The Emerald Ash Borer is here!

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    06 Sep 2018

    Do you have an Ash tree that is dying or dead?

    If your dead or near dying tree is located in a yard or along a street, it will likely pose a hazard over time and should be removed if showing any signs of Emerald Ash Borer. However, if one of your ash trees is within a woodlot, it is much less likely to pose a danger to you or your family. If left standing, these trees can provide valuable habitat for wildlife. Standing dead trees are an integral component of a healthy ecosystem, creating nesting sites for birds, sheltered cavities for mammals and structure for a variety of other organisms.

    Safety, however, should be your top priority — if you think that the tree could be a hazard for you or others, be safe and remove it. If you plan to remove your tree, hire a reliable, insured, licensed arborist/tree service company. You may wish to hire a tree removal company on your own. Joining with your neighbors to hire a single company for a large group of local tree removals may also allow you to benefit from bulk purchasing prices. Don’t wait until ash tree is dead, tree contractors do not want to work on dead or near dead ash trees, these trees are unpredictable trees during the cutting process and become a hazard to personal contractor safety and public safety. Before hiring a company, be sure to obtain: • Estimates from multiple companies. • Proof of insurance. • Written estimates of cost. • Written agreement on disposal/site cleanup requirements. • References.

    For a list of local arborists or for tips on how to select a tree service company, please contact your yellow pages, the internet, or www.huronkinloss.com business listings. More information can also be found at: https://www.ontario.ca/page/emerald-ash-borer